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Images: Artifacts from Extraordinary Women in Science

  • 400 Years of Women in Science

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    CREDIT: Megan Gannon/LiveScience
  • Marie Meurdrac, Chemist

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    CREDIT: Courtesy, The Othmer Library of Chemical History, The Chemical Heritage Foundation.
  • Louise Bourgeois Boursier, Midwife

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    CREDIT: Megan Gannon/LiveScience
  • Beevers-Lipson Strips

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    CREDIT: Private Collection
  • Marie Curie

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    CREDIT: Private Collection
  • Émilie du Châtelet, Physicist

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    CREDIT: Private Collection
  • Du Chatelet's Notebook

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    CREDIT: Megan Gannon/LiveScience
  • Lise Meitner's Autograph

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    CREDIT: Megan Gannon/LiveScience
An exhibition at New York's Grolier Club, "Extraordinary Women in Science & Medicine: Four Centuries of Achievement," gathers artifacts and manuscripts related to some of the greatest scientific minds of the last 400 years. This image shows Marie Curie's book about her experiences during World War I, when she helped the French military use x-rays to identify soldier's wounds. Curie, who discovered radioactivity, is one of the most famous scientists of all time, but many of the other women featured in the show are not as well known.

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