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Album: The World's Biggest Beasts

  • Here: Polar Bear

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    CREDIT: Credit: US Fish & Wildlife Services
  • Gone: Mammoth

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    CREDIT: Credit: AP file image
  • Here: Great White Shark

    3 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: Jeremy Stafford-Deitsch, www.sharktrust.org
  • Gone: Mega Shark

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    CREDIT: Credit: LiveScience Illustration
  • Here: Whales

    5 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: Lars Lenitz / Stock.XCHNG
  • Here: Manatee

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    CREDIT: Credit: AquaMarine Images Photo Gallery
  • Here: Sea Turtle

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    CREDIT: Credit: Stock.XCHNG
  • Here: African Elephant

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    CREDIT: Credit: © Chuck Bargeron, The University of Georgia
  • Here: Rhino

    9 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: Honolulu Zoo
  • Here: Buffalo

    10 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: US Fish & Wildlife Services
  • Gone: Dinosaurs

    11 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: 2003 Calvin J. Hamilton
  • Here: Hippo

    12 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: John De Boer / Stock.XCHNG
  • Gone: Giant Ape

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    CREDIT: +McMaster+University target=new class=bottomnav>Gigantopithecus blackii, lived alongside humans for over a million years. Fortunately for the early humans, the 10-foot tall and 1,200 pound primate's diet consisted mainly of bamboo. Unfortunately f
  • Here: Elusive Squid

    14 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: AP Photo/HO, National Science Museum
  • Gone: Saber-Toothed Tiger

    15 of 15
    CREDIT: Credit: California Blue Book; Statutes of California; California Government Code
Polar bears are the largest species of bear and biggest carnivores on land. Males commonly weigh in around 1,300 pounds while females are typically smaller and weigh up to 650 pounds. Warming temperatures are shrinking the polar bear’s arctic habitat, and some scientists believe the bears could be extinct by the end of the century.

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